Why It’s Fine To Make Time For Wine

Wine TimeSource: Flickr

My family has a tradition of drinking wine, everyday, at 4:00. It is a tradition that I love. It gives me something to look forward to on a daily basis. Who doesn’t want that?

Making time in my day to sit back, relax, and drink a glass of wine has helped me keep my sanity. As a broke full time employee, I find it essential to find something to appreciate.

Relax

I have been the type of person who would come home from a horrible day at work to just keeping worrying about work. If I wasn’t dreading one thing, it was another. Even if I had a day off, I was counting down the hours until I would be back at my job. I never let my mind be at ease. Unfortunately, I know I am not the only human being who has gone through this.

Red Wine has been shown to have a calming effect on a persons body. Sipping on a glass before or during dinner could help you have a relaxing evening. It is no secret that everyone needs a moment to unwind. Taking a small block of time to sit and enjoy your surroundings while sipping on a glass of merlot (or whichever you prefer) will ease a lot of tension.

Love Your Heart

Another benefit of our beloved adult grape juice is resveratrol. This antioxidant is famed for protecting against heart disease. Resveratrol works by preventing plaque formation and blood clotting, and increasing HDL (good cholesterol). To further my argument, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S.

Boost Immunity

According to LiveStrong.com, red wine contains polyphenol. This antioxidant combats disease-causing free radicals and boosts the immune system. When I find myself getting sick, I reach for my cabernet sauvignon instead of Nyquil.

In Conclusion

I’ll admit, the health benefits of wine are not the reasons why I enjoy a glass each day. I find pleasure in taking a break from the daily tedious tasks I am bound to. For my family, it is a special time in the day for everyone to drop what they are doing and come together. This is true, even if it is just for a short moment. Either way, it is something to look forward to.

Everyone needs a little something to look forward to.

Photos courtesy of Flickr and bonappetit.com

Follow Up

As promised, I am writing my next blog on the response I received from the job I was rejected for. Let’s start by taking a look at the email response:

Hi,

 

Thank you for following up. We ended up going in a direction with someone with more social media experience. My advice is that if you are looking to transition your career into the social and digital space I would begin by creating personal accounts on all social platforms and really familiarizing yourself with the space. I have also found that staying current on tech blogs like AdAge, Mashable, and TechCrunch really help to keep me informed on trends and innovations in the space.

 

Best of luck in your search,

______________________________

I was not surprised when I read; “We ended up going in a direction with someone with more social media experience.” This is an answer that many people hear when applying for jobs. Companies will not typically tell you exactly why they didn’t like you, as there are too many opportunities for litigation. Hence, queue the response, “We chose someone with more experience.”

Fortunately, this person was generous enough to give me advice on how to improve my skills:

My advice is that if you are looking to transition your career into the social and digital space I would begin by creating personal accounts on all social platforms and really familiarizing yourself with the space.

I thought that having business accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and personal accounts on Instagram, Vine, and Pheed would be enough. After searching the web for all social media outlets, I realized I was far from having enough. There are far over a hundred sites when searching through the list provided on Wikipedia. Am I really expected to manage that many accounts in my free time??? As a full time employee and owner of an online retail store, I find this to be a HUGE challenge.

How many accounts do you manage? How much time do you dedicate to each platform?

The last chunk of the email states that I should spend more time reading blogs:

I have also found that staying current on tech blogs like AdAge, Mashable, and TechCrunch really help to keep me informed on trends and innovations in the space.

There was a time in the phone interview where I was asked if I followed any blogs, and if so, which ones. This question caught me off guard, as I don’t follow any blogs in particular. I could tell right off the bat that when I said I don’t follow any, I was in trouble. To be honest, I spend more time learning new trends on social media sites that often link to articles or blog posts that peak my interest while browsing.

My current job requires me to work full time on a computer. When I’m not at my job, I manage social networks and a website that I own. When I’m done with my work, the last thing I want to do is spend MORE time in front of a computer screen. However, when it comes to improving yourself, there should be no limits. Now, I not only read blogs, but write one as well!

Take all advice that is given to you from employers (no matter how ridiculous it seems). Dedication and self-improvement will only help you climb the mountain that stands in your way.

“We regret to inform you…”

Image

Photo courtesy of Flickr

Re•gret – Verb

Feel sad, repentant, or disappointed over (something that has happened or been done, especially a loss or missed opportunity) -Oxford University Press, 2013

I’ve always disliked the use of the phrase, “We regret to inform you…” when advising a person that they were not selected for a job. Are they really saddened over my lost opportunity? Why add lies on top of the insult?

Ouch.

I recently was rejected for a job opportunity that I wanted badly. I studied for two weeks before my interview in hopes that it would help me ace any questions that came my way. Unfortunately, my hard work did not pay off. Three days after my interview, I received an automated rejection letter stating that my dreams would not be coming true with that company.

My first reaction was disbelief. I read the short email several times hoping that I had read it wrong the time before. Next, I experienced sadness. My eyes swelled with tears as the rejection settled in. As I wiped my cheeks dry, a thought hit me. Why not me? Soon my sadness turned to anger and frustration. Seriously, why not me?

I opened the rejection letter again to scan for an explanation that I knew wasn’t there. I wanted to know why someone else was picked. What did they have that I didn’t?

As a result, I pondered the idea of sending an email to ask the source directly.

Be Proactive

Several articles across the Internet state their opinions on the matter. Some say to go for it, while others claim it is in bad taste. I decided to go for it:

Hello ______,

I wanted to take the time to thank you for the opportunity to interview for the Social Media Coordinator position.

If you have the time, I would really appreciate any constructive feedback you have on how to further improve my skills for future opportunities at _______. I am extremely dedicated to my career, and any insight would be helpful.

Thank you!

Kind regards,

____________

As you can see, I went the positive route. Instead of asking why I didn’t get it, I asked what I needed to improve for future opportunities. In my opinion, I felt this tactic would increase my chances of getting a response. I did not want to put anyone on edge and possibly hurt my reputation.

The Waiting Game

I am still awaiting a response to my email (if I get one at all). Once received, I will be happy to post another blog discussing what I learned and what steps should be taken next.

Thank you for reading. Please share your thoughts below!